The Future Of Contact Lenses – Part 2

The Future Of Contact Lenses – Part 2

We’ve learned the history of contact lenses and now it’s time to take a gander into the future. We don’t have a crystal ball, but we do have the Internet, and that’s pretty close to the same thing these days. Contacts have ranged from full glass eye panels to the thin plastic lens we know and love today. In the next five, 10, or even 20 years, we might have contacts that are the new smart devices. From entertainment purposes to administering medication, scientists have their eyes on contact lenses that are more useful than only correcting failing vision. Contact Lens Advancements On The Horizon Smart Technology Just like in all of the great sci-fi films, contact lenses of the future may give wearers access to a world powered by electricity. Electronics and eyeglasses are in the works as we speak, but applying this nano technology to a contact lens can help set the precedent for a new way of life, a way that monitors a person’s eye health, provides necessary information to avoid trouble, and one that makes it a bit easier to entertain on the go. However, one hurdle currently in the way of this sci-fi dream becoming a reality is the germs that can accumulate on contacts that are worn 24/7. Once this dilemma is solved, these futuristic lenses could easily become the new norm. Medical Right now, certain diseases such as glaucoma, diabetes, and high blood pressure can be detected through regular exams. People with these diseases visit specialists multiple times each year. With smart contact lenses, the lens itself could detect when pressure is...

All You Need to Know About Cataracts

Eye care, from a young age on, is important for the future of your eyes. The healthier lifestyle you lead, the less chance there is of developing eye illnesses. An illness that is more common as people get older is cataracts. However, seniors are not the only ones who develop cataracts. Learn more about cataracts and eye care by reading through this blog and contact your local optometrist at the eye clinic Vision Care Centre. Our opticians are passionate about the health of your eyes and want you to have a resource you can rely on when you need more information on eye care. Contact our eye clinic today for an eye exam. Cataracts Aren’t On Your Eyes Many may think that a cataract actually forms on the eye, that it is a coating on the surface of the lens that hinders eyesight. However, a cataract forms on the inside of the eye when proteins break down and can cause the distortion of your vision. With healthy eyes, these proteins are clear; but as a cataract forms, the proteins break down leaving behind a haze in your vision. When the cataract is forming, you can’t feel it and it may take years to develop enough to hinder your eyesight. This is why it’s important for people over a certain age to have regular eye tests at an eye clinic. Learn Why It’s Important to Have an Eye Exam! Cataracts Don’t Just Occur In Older People There are several risk factors that can cause people as young as 40 to develop cataracts. If you have sustained an injury, have had an...
Macular Degeneration Guide: What It Is & What To Look For

Macular Degeneration Guide: What It Is & What To Look For

More than 11 million people in the United States have some form of macular degeneration. This is a serious and potentially blinding eye condition that primarily affects people over the age of 60. What, exactly, is it? What are the warning signs? And can it be treated by our eye clinic in Langley? Let’s take a closer look at macular degeneration. What Is Macular Degeneration? Macular degeneration affects a part of the eye known as the macula. The macula is a visible area of the retina in the back of your eye that’s responsible for your sharpest vision. This area allows you to see objects that are straight ahead of you. The loss of the macula can inhibit your ability to do activities such as read or drive your car, although you may still retain some of your peripheral vision. Macular degeneration is the deterioration of this area of the retina. What Causes It? No one really knows what causes macular degeneration, but there are some factors that can make you more at risk. Age is the biggest risk factor; people over the age of 60 are at the highest risk and will want to be screened for the condition when they visit our eye clinic in Langley. Smoking doubles your risk of developing macular degeneration. You may be at higher risk if the condition runs in your family, too. What Are the Warning Signs? People who develop macular degeneration don’t experience pain; this is a pain-free eye condition. They may, however, experience unusual symptoms with their sight. This includes text appearing blurry when you look at it or...
Can You Answer These Questions About the Eye?

Can You Answer These Questions About the Eye?

Your eyes play an important role in your everyday life. They do everything from helping you with your job to aid you in watching for danger and are even responsible for helping you make memories. But how much do you really know about your eyes? Our eyecare centre in Langley challenges you to take this quiz to test your eye knowledge. Check your answers below and let our eye clinic in Langley know how many you got right! Question 1: How many nerves connect the eye to the brain? a. More than 100 b. More than 10,000 c. More than 1,000,000 Question 2: How many people around the world are blind? a. 3.9 million b. 39 million c. 390 million Question 3: How much does the average eyeball weight? a. .25 oz b. 2.5 oz c. 25 oz Question 4: How many colors can the human eye see? a. 1 million b. 10 million c. 100 million Question 5: What’s the oldest eye color? a. Green b. Blue c. Brown Answer 1: It’s c, more than 1,000,000! The eyes are intricately connected to our brains, which is part of the reason our eyesight is so vital to the process of making and store memories. Our brains process what our eyes “see,” so there is a lot of communication between the two. This series of nerves is so intricate and complicated that doctors cannot successfully reattach them to a new eyeball to restore sight (yet!). Answer 2: The answer is b, 39 million. That’s according to the World Health Organization, who also reports that there are an estimated 246 million...

Glaucoma: Avoid Irreversible Vision Loss

The other day, I was having lunch with a friend who had just gotten her yearly eye exam at her local optometrist. Besides her expected nearsightedness and some trouble with dry eyes, her eye doctor did not have much to tell her, but that didn’t stop her from worrying over her husband. He refuses to have an eye exam, and he’s in his mid-forties. My friend asked me if she was worrying for no reason; after all, her husband’s vision has seemed to be fine for years. My response to my friend was the inspiration for this blog: hadn’t he ever heard of glaucoma, the leading worldwide cause of irreversible vision loss? Keep reading to learn about this “silent thief of eyesight” and how regular eye exams can prevent it from stealing your vision. What is glaucoma? As briefly discussed in a previous blog post, glaucoma describes a group of conditions that cause damage to the optic nerve, which is a paired nerve connected to both eyeballs and responsible for relaying images from the retina to the brain. Without a properly-functioning optic nerve, these images cannot reach the brain, but how does damage to the optic nerve occur? The optic nerve is made up of millions of delicate nerve fibers; when these fibers are damaged, it will have a negative effect on your vision. Some experience a loss of peripheral vision followed by a progressive darkness while others develop blind spots from the damaged nerve fibers. How these fibers get damaged is not fully understood at this point, but we do know that both high eye pressure and low...