Strabismus

Strabismus usually starts in early childhood.  This misalignment of the eye(s) either in/out/up/down should be treated to prevent amblyopia (lazy eye).  Treatment includes glasses, contact lenses, prisms, vision therapy or...

Dry eye

Dry eye is a condition where either the eye does not produce enough tears, or the tears do not lubricate the eyes sufficiently. This makes the eyes feel uncomfortable, gritty, burning, and sometimes makes the white of the eyes appear very red.  Dry eye can affect anyone at any time, although it is more common as we get older and as a side effect from medication.  Confusingly one common symptom is the eyes watering excessively, especially in windy weather.  Often, symptoms can be relieved by treating the glands in the eyelids and by using artificial tears to lubricate the eyes better, although long term dry eye may need further investigation to rule out any general health...

Styes

A stye is an infection on the edge of the eyelid that appears slightly red, swollen and feels tender.  Vision is not affected.  Usually styes heal on their own, however a hot compress can help, and if recurring then antibiotic ointment can be...

Cataracts

Cataract is a term used to describe the gradual aging and cloudiness of the lens in the eye software task management.  When we are born the lens is perfectly clear and supple, but as we age the lens becomes more opaque and less flexible.  This has the effect of us needing more light in order to see as we get older, and objects generally appearing a little hazier or sensation of a film over the eyes. Sometimes the lens can become so opaque that it affects the vision, and causes problems such as glare (especially at night). Initially the vision can be improved by new eyeglasses but eventually a short surgical procedure will be required to replace the opaque natural lens with a clear artificial lens. There is evidence that suggests wearing UV protection outdoors; and a diet rich in vitamin A,C, E & selenium; avoidance of smoke, alcohol & pollution have preventative...

Diabetes

Diabetes is caused when the body is unable to properly regulate the amount of glucose in the blood.  Symptoms can be very mild and so can be very difficult to spot.  Long term poor control of diabetes can affect the eyes by causing retinal blood vessels to leak.  The blood vessels become more prone to bleeding, causing risk to the sight of the eye.  Generally speaking, the earlier any diabetic retinopathy is noticed in the eyes the better the outcome after any treatment.  People with diabetes are also more prone to cataract and macular changes causing a reduction in vision.  Because of this, diabetic patients are advised to have regular eye exams.  At Vision Care these are covered with a BC care card...